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ShockOne: “To be next to guys like Michael Bublé is just fucking weird”

Why do you think there is such a backlash against dubstep and drum’n’bass at the moment?

Firstly I want to state that I don’t think there is necessarily a ‘backlash’ so to speak, I just think as everything does, things are moving on. What I do see happening though, and this isn’t isolated to dubstep or drum’n’bass or any particular genre, is an issue of people identifying with certain types of music and how that affects the social perception of said style of music.

For instance, with dubstep, drum’n’bass and bass music – even metal music – the people who listen to this type of music are generally incredibly dedicated passionate fans and usually consider themselves somewhat alternative and identify with underground culture. It’s not uncommon for people to listen to these styles almost exclusively. So with this you get some of the best crowds in the world in my opinion. I’ve never seen people go as mental in a crowd than I have at drum’n’bass, dubstep and metal shows; it’s insane and I love it and thank every single person who’s gone mental at one of my shows.

But I think one of the reasons they are going so mental and are so passionate about the music is the fact that the music is so important to them that it makes up part of their identity. ‘I am a metal head’, ‘I am a junglist’ – in short people use the music as a way to define themselves, partly at least. So when this music changes, gets commercial, or an artist someone worships writes music that is outside of the status quo or what they expect to hear from that artist, you see people getting incredibly angry because whether they realise it or not, their whole personal identity is being compromised.

Did you feel that you had to move to the UK to pursue your music?

I had people telling me I needed to get over to the UK for about four years before I actually did it. And while from a DJing point of view it makes total sense – it’s hard to tour the world as a DJ when you’re based in the second most isolated city on earth – I’m really glad I stayed in Australia and continued my career there for as long as I did. I like to think that my staying in Australia, and gaining some musical success while there, showed that as a drum and bass producer and DJ you don’t necessarily need to leave Australia to be successful.

Do you have any predictions or thoughts on where the Australian scene might be moving to next, and do you feel it’s simply following the rest of the world or forging out its own path?

Now more than ever I think the electronic music world, whether it be in Australia or anywhere else, is in a really interesting place. Now that the whole dubstep explosion has settled down a bit, and the American EDM thing is kind of just becoming ultra-commercial music, there isn’t really a bandwagon to jump on, which to me is an amazing and exciting thing. You can see and feel everyone looking at each other going, ‘What do we do? What do we make?’ and it’s at these times when I feel like you get some truly creative, out-there stuff coming through.

Do you think Australia should have a little more faith in our position as a true electronic music force?

To be honest, I think things are really good at the moment with artists being recognised and receiving support and success. I mean, shit: Flume, Ta-ku, Rufus, Phetsta, Ekko and Sidetrack, Wave Racer, The Aston Shuffle, Kito and Reija Lee, What So Not, Alpine, Sampology, Nick Thayer, Marlo, Tommy Trash, Naysayer, Chet Faker, Acid Jacks, Owl Eyes, Beni, Flight Facilities, Cut Copy, The Presets, Empire Of The Sun, Anna Lunoe, Jagwar Ma, Peking Duk, Alison Wonderland, Hermitude; all amazing Australian electronic artists doing their thing. That’s a fucking impressive list of fucking impressive music if you ask me. Go Ostraya!

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